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Research Article  |   June 1989
Stroke Rehabilitation: Sensorimotor Integrative Treatment Versus Functional Treatment
Author Affiliations
  • Lyn Jongbloed, PhD, OT(C), is Assistant Professor in the School of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. (Mailing address: 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1W5.)
  • Susan Stacey, BSR, OT(C), is a senior occupational therapist at Holy Family Hospital, Vancouver, Canada
  • Cathy Brighton, BSc(OT), OT(C), is an occupational therapist at Holy Family Hospital, Vancouver, Canada
Article Information
Complementary/Alternative Approaches / Stroke / Features
Research Article   |   June 1989
Stroke Rehabilitation: Sensorimotor Integrative Treatment Versus Functional Treatment
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, June 1989, Vol. 43, 391-397. doi:10.5014/ajot.43.6.391
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, June 1989, Vol. 43, 391-397. doi:10.5014/ajot.43.6.391
Abstract

This study compares the effectiveness of two occupational therapy approaches to treating cerebrovascular accident patients—the functional and sensorimotor integrative approaches. Subjects were 90 patients admitted to Holy Family Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, within 12 weeks after a first stroke. Consenting subjects were randomly assigned on admission to one of two occupational therapy treatment groups. All subjects received similar medical and nursing care and physical therapy.

An independent clinical evaluator assessed subjects’ function in self-care and mobility, meal preparation, and sensorimotor integration at specified times after admission. Neither the evaluator nor the subjects were aware of the treatment group to which they had been assigned.

Results showed no statistically significant differences between the two treatment groups on the three outcome measures. We therefore concluded that any differences between the effectiveness of the two approaches are small.