Free
Research Article  |   August 1989
The Effect of Positioning on the Hand Function of Boys With Cerebral Palsy
Author Affiliations
  • Janette Noronha, MS, OTR/L, is an occupational therapist at Handicapped Children’s Services, Washington, DC
  • Anita Bundy, ScD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Associated Health Professions, The University of Illinois at Chicago, 1919 West Taylor Street, Chicago, Illinois 60612
  • Janet Groll, OTS, at the time of this study, was a student in the Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Associated Health Professions, The University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
Article Information
Hand and Upper Extremity / Neurologic Conditions / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Features
Research Article   |   August 1989
The Effect of Positioning on the Hand Function of Boys With Cerebral Palsy
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 1989, Vol. 43, 507-512. doi:10.5014/ajot.43.8.507
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 1989, Vol. 43, 507-512. doi:10.5014/ajot.43.8.507
Abstract

The effect of positioning (sitting and prone standing) on the hand function of 10 boys (mean age = 12.5 years, SD = 1.2 years) with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy was studied. Two groups of subjects were tested twice (Tests 1 and 2) with the Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test (Jebsen, Taylor, Treischmann, Trotter, & Howard, 1969; Taylor, Sand, & Jebsen, 1973) to measure rate of manipulation. In addition, a scale modified from Hohlstein (1982) was used to measure quality of grasp on each subtest of the Jebsen-Taylor test. No significant differences between the mean scores of the two groups were found on the total scores of the Jebsen-Taylor test, either between Tests 1 and 2 or between sitting and prone standing. When the data from Tests 1 and 2 were combined, it was found that on one subtest—simulated feeding—the subjects performed significantly faster while in a prone standing position. On another subtest—picking up small objects—the subjects performed significantly faster while in a sitting position. Except during the simulated feeding subtest, the quality of the subjects’ grasp was observed to be mature and tailored to the objects manipulated. This paper presents considerations for analyzing positioning in relation to upper extremity tasks.