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Research Article  |   August 1989
The Effects of a Maternal Preparation Program on Mother–Infant Pairs: A Pilot Study
Author Affiliations
  • Carol Hamilton-Dodd, MA, OTR, is an occupational therapist at Stanford Hospital, Palo Alto, California
  • Toni Kawamoto, OTR, is a staff occupational therapist, Veterans Administration Hospital, Sepulveda Medical Center, Sepulveda, California
  • Florence Clark, PhD, OTR, is Chair and Professor, University of Southern California, Department of Occupational Therapy, 2250 Alcazar, CSA 203, Los Angeles, California 90033
  • Janice P. Burke, MA, OTR, is Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Shan Pin Fanchiang, OTR, is a staff occupational therapist, Glendale Adventist Medical Center, Rehabilitation Institute, Department of Occupational Therapy, Glendale, California
Article Information
Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Features
Research Article   |   August 1989
The Effects of a Maternal Preparation Program on Mother–Infant Pairs: A Pilot Study
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 1989, Vol. 43, 513-521. doi:10.5014/ajot.43.8.513
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 1989, Vol. 43, 513-521. doi:10.5014/ajot.43.8.513
Abstract

This quasi-experimental pilot study examined the association of a maternal preparation program with womens’ competence in maternal care behaviors, self-perceived adaptation to the maternal role, and satisfaction with the maternal preparation received in conjunction with obstetric and delivery care. Sixteen subjects participated in the program. A cost–benefit questionnaire was completed by the program participants to examine whether the availability of such a maternal preparation program would influence future selections of a hospital for delivery. Our Occupational Therapy Maternal Role Preparation Program was provided to the subjects in four sessions. The program included material on physiological changes in the new mother, orchestration of activities of daily living, infant development and individual differences, and the mother–infant relationship. Results were statistically significant only for the factor of the mothers’ satisfaction with their obstetric care and preparation for the maternal role, in favor of the treatment group. In addition, all 8 members of the treatment group reported that they thought the program was helpful and would recommend it to other mothers.