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Research Article  |   August 1989
A Critical Review of Scales of Activities of Daily Living
Author Affiliations
  • Mary Law, MSc, OT(C), is Assistant Professor in the Departments of Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, and Research Manager, Occupational Therapy, Chedoke-McMaster Hospitals, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 3Z5
  • Lori Letts, OT(C), at the time this article was written, was Occupational Therapy Supervisor, Para Med Health Services, Chatham, Ontario. She is currently a staff therapist, Chedoke-McMaster Hospitals, Hamilton, Ontario
Article Information
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Research Article   |   August 1989
A Critical Review of Scales of Activities of Daily Living
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 1989, Vol. 43, 522-528. doi:10.5014/ajot.43.8.522
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 1989, Vol. 43, 522-528. doi:10.5014/ajot.43.8.522
Abstract

Occupational therapists routinely perform activities of daily living (ADL) assessments. Although the literature contains many ADL scales, few sources summarize and review the measurement properties of such scales. In this paper, standard criteria are used to review scales of basic self-care. Each scale is critically appraised regarding its purpose, clinical utility, construction, standardization, reliability, and validity. Recommendations are made regarding the ADL scales that are most suitable for describing, predicting, or evaluating ADL function. This review is intended to help therapists in selecting the most appropriate ADL measure to use in their clinical practice.