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Research Article  |   November 1989
Occupational Therapy Treatment Practices With Infants in Early Intervention
Author Affiliations
  • Delia Gorga, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, is Assistant Professor of Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, New York Hospital–Cornell Medical Center, 525 East 68th Street, New York, New York 10021
Article Information
Early Intervention / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Features
Research Article   |   November 1989
Occupational Therapy Treatment Practices With Infants in Early Intervention
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November 1989, Vol. 43, 731-736. doi:10.5014/ajot.43.11.731
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November 1989, Vol. 43, 731-736. doi:10.5014/ajot.43.11.731
Abstract

This paper explores occupational therapy treatment practices for infants (birth to age 2 years) in early intervention programs. Generic treatment is viewed as the facilitation of the infant’s independence through improved motor control, sensory modulation, adaptive coping, sensorimotor development, social–emotional development, daily living skills, and play. Treatment practices in specialized settings, that is, in a neonatal intensive care unit and in a follow-up program for high-risk infants, are outlined. The efficacy of intervention is discussed in light of recent research findings and of the comments made by critics of early intervention.