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Research Article  |   February 1988
The OSOT Perceptual Evaluation: A Research Perspective
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marian Boys, OT(C), is Supervisor of Occupational Therapy, The Riverdale Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4M 2B5, Canada
  • Pat Fisher, Dip OT, OT(C), is Clinical Supervisor, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Toronto, Ontario
  • Claire Holzberg, Dip OT, OT(C), is Senior Occupational Therapist, Department of Extended Care, Sunnybrook Medical Centre, Toronto, Ontario
  • David W. Reid, PhD, is Associate Professor of Psychology, York University, and Geriatric Research Consultant, Sunnybrook Medical Centre, Toronto, Ontario
  • Authors’ Note. The first three authors were co-investigators, contributing equally to the research. The fourth author was a research consultant to the study.
    Authors’ Note. The first three authors were co-investigators, contributing equally to the research. The fourth author was a research consultant to the study.×
Article Information
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Research Article   |   February 1988
The OSOT Perceptual Evaluation: A Research Perspective
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, February 1988, Vol. 42, 92-98. doi:10.5014/ajot.42.2.92
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, February 1988, Vol. 42, 92-98. doi:10.5014/ajot.42.2.92
Abstract

Although the Ontario Society of Occupational Therapists (OSOT) Perceptual Evaluation has been widely used, it has never been standardized. A study was undertaken to examine the validity of the battery for differentiating neurologically normal persons from those who have been independently diagnosed as neurologically impaired. A group of 80 brain-damaged patients was compared with a matched group of 70 neurologically normal persons. Comparison of scores for the two groups supports the validity of the instrument for differentiating the neurologically normal from the perceptually impaired person. The distribution of scores suggests that the degree of impairment can be classified as mild, moderate, or severe. Finally, the OSOT Perceptual Evaluation is found to be a reliable procedure for the assessment of perceptual dysfunction.