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Research Article  |   April 1988
Hand Splinting for Infants in the Intensive Care and Special Care Nurseries
Author Affiliations
  • Linda J. Anderson, OTR, at the time of this study, was Pediatric Therapist for the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore. She currently is a consultant for the development of occupational therapy services for neonatal and infant care. (Mailing address: 3420 Carriage Hill Circle, Apt. 104, Randallstown, Maryland 21133.)
  • J. Michael Anderson, MD, is Associate in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore
Article Information
Hand and Upper Extremity / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Splinting / Features
Research Article   |   April 1988
Hand Splinting for Infants in the Intensive Care and Special Care Nurseries
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, April 1988, Vol. 42, 222-226. doi:10.5014/ajot.42.4.222
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, April 1988, Vol. 42, 222-226. doi:10.5014/ajot.42.4.222
Abstract

Infants in intensive care nurseries often have hand deformities and hand dysfunction. The traditional therapeutic approaches to hand care used in the treatment of adults, young children, and older infants are not always adequate to prevent progressive deformity in preterm and neonatal infants. Medical instability, time constraints, lack of family participation in the therapeutic program, the complexity of the treatment program, and fear of harming the infant are considerations that may indicate the need for splinting as an adjunctive therapeutic intervention. A number of factors are particularly important in making splints for infants, including splint alignment and padding, strap attachment, and thermoplastic malleability.