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Research Article  |   July 1988
The Effects of Chronic Otitis Media on Motor Performance in 5- and 6-Year-Old Children
Author Affiliations
  • Therese Von, MOT, OTR, at the time of this study, was a graduate student in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at the University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. She is now working at Providence Day Treatment, Portland, Oregon
  • Jean C. Deitz, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, is Assistant Professor in Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. (Mailing address: School of Medicine, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, RJ–30, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98150.)
  • John McLaughlin, MD, is Associate Professor in Pediatrics, Congenital Defects, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
  • Suzette DeButts, MS, OTR, is an occupational therapist in the Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, Washington
  • Mark Richardson, MD, is Associate Professor, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
Article Information
Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Features
Research Article   |   July 1988
The Effects of Chronic Otitis Media on Motor Performance in 5- and 6-Year-Old Children
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 1988, Vol. 42, 421-426. doi:10.5014/ajot.42.7.421
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 1988, Vol. 42, 421-426. doi:10.5014/ajot.42.7.421
Abstract

Two 16-member groups of 5- and 6-year-old children, one group with a history of chronic otitis media and one without such a history, were tested on three measures of motor performance. These were the Motor Accuracy Test–Revised, the Stott Test of Motor Impairment, and measures of duration of standing balance. These instruments assess, respectively, fine motor coordination, overall motor skills, and balance. On each of these measures, children with a history of chronic otitis media scored lower than children without such a history. However, when these scores were compared statistically, no significant differences were found between the two groups. Because the results of this study were inconclusive, routine motor performance evaluation of children with a history of chronic otitis media is not advocated at this time.