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Research Article  |   September 1988
Perceived Autonomy and Job Satisfaction in Occupational Therapists
Author Affiliations
  • Gerald L. Davis, MS, OTR/L, is Administrative Director, Rehabilitation Services, Providence Hospital, 1912 Hayes Avenue, Sandusky, Ohio 44870
  • James E. Bordieri, PhD, is Associate Professor, Rehabilitation Institute, Division of the College of Human Resources, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, Illinois
Article Information
Professional Issues / Features
Research Article   |   September 1988
Perceived Autonomy and Job Satisfaction in Occupational Therapists
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September 1988, Vol. 42, 591-595. doi:10.5014/ajot.42.9.591
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September 1988, Vol. 42, 591-595. doi:10.5014/ajot.42.9.591
Abstract

Perceived autonomy, overall job satisfaction, and specific work incentives and disincentives were surveyed in 249 occupational therapists. Respondents rated autonomy and job satisfaction moderately high. They perceived achievement, interpersonal relationships with co-workers, and the nature of the work itself as incentives. The lack of organizational support for training, opportunity for advancement, and working conditions were seen as job disincentives. Results also showed that perceived autonomy was positively related to overall job satisfaction and to each job satisfaction factor.