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Research Article  |   February 1987
A Program for Improving Energy Conservation Behaviors in Adults With Rheumatoid Arthritis
Author Affiliations
  • Gloria Platt Furst, OTR, MPH, is a consultant, Occupational Therapy Service, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892
  • Lynn H. Gerber, MD, is Chief, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland
  • Cynthia C. Smith, OTR, at the time of this study, was Chief, Occupational Therapy Service, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. She is now in private practice in Bethesda
  • Susan Fisher, RN, MS, at the time of this study, was a nurse statistician, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Mary land. She is now a biostatistician, Cooperative Studies Program, Veterans Administration Hospital, Hines, Illinois
  • Barbara Shulman, at the time of this study, was a research assistant, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. She is now a graduate student in physical therapy at Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts
Article Information
Arthritis / Musculoskeletal Impairments / Rheumatoid Arthritis / Features
Research Article   |   February 1987
A Program for Improving Energy Conservation Behaviors in Adults With Rheumatoid Arthritis
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, February 1987, Vol. 41, 102-111. doi:10.5014/ajot.41.2.102
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, February 1987, Vol. 41, 102-111. doi:10.5014/ajot.41.2.102
Abstract

This paper presents the design and evaluation of an occupational therapy program developed at the National Institutes of Health for teaching energy conservation and joint protection to adults with rheumatoid arthritis. An existing model for educational diagnosis in health education was used to identify program, behavioral, and educational objectives for the new program. The use of this model resulted in measurable objectives, which were used as outcome measures in the randomized research evaluation of the new program. The dependent variables measured were activity-of-daily-living status, psychosocial adjustment to illness, knowledge, disease activity, pain, and fatigue. None were significantly different after the intervention. The independent variables measured included components of balancing rest and physical activity. After 3 months, a greater percentage of the subjects receiving the workbook-based occupational therapy program than those receiving traditional occupational therapy demonstrated an application of the behaviors the intervention was designed to change.