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Research Article  |   February 1987
Effects of Splinting in the Treatment of Hand Contractures in Progressive Systemic Sclerosis
Author Affiliations
  • Melinda W. Seeger, OTR, is a consultant to the Rheumatology Division, 1000 Veteran Avenue, Room 32-47, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90024
  • Daniel E. Furst, MD, is Associate Professor, Division of Rheumatology, University of Iowa, Iowa City
Article Information
Hand and Upper Extremity / Musculoskeletal Impairments / Splinting / Features
Research Article   |   February 1987
Effects of Splinting in the Treatment of Hand Contractures in Progressive Systemic Sclerosis
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, February 1987, Vol. 41, 118-121. doi:10.5014/ajot.41.2.118
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, February 1987, Vol. 41, 118-121. doi:10.5014/ajot.41.2.118
Abstract

One of the major factors in the decreasing functional ability of patients with progressive systemic sclerosis is involvement of the patient’s hands with secondary immobility and contractures. In a 2-month study of 19 patients, we assessed whether dynamic splinting could decrease proximal interphalangeal (PIP) flexion contractures. Of the eight patients who completed the study, one experienced a statistically significant improvement in PIP range of motion as a result of the splinting. There was no evidence that the use of the splints served to maintain PIP extension when compared with the control hand.