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Research Article  |   July 1987
Body Part Identification in 1- to 4-Year-Old Children
Author Affiliations
  • At the time this study was conducted Kathryn MacWhinney was an occupational therapy graduate student in the post-professional master of science degree program at Boston University. She is now an occupational therapist at North Shore Special Education Consortium, Peabody, Massachusetts. (Mailing address: 75 Orchard Street, Medford. Massachusetts 02155.)
  • Sharon A. Cermak, EdD, OTR, FAOTA, is Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy at Boston University and a faculty member of Sensory Integration International
  • Anne Fisher, ScD, OTR, FAOTA, is Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy at Boston University and a faculty member of Sensory Integration International
Article Information
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Research Article   |   July 1987
Body Part Identification in 1- to 4-Year-Old Children
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 1987, Vol. 41, 454-459. doi:10.5014/ajot.41.7.454
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 1987, Vol. 41, 454-459. doi:10.5014/ajot.41.7.454
Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the sequence in which body parts are learned and can be identified by very young children. The 101 children tested were divided into four age groups: 1-year-olds, 2-year-olds, 3-year-olds, and 4-year-olds. The children were requested to point to 20 body parts on a doll. Analysis of the results indicated significant differences in the ability to identify body parts by age and sex. The greatest increase in scores occurred between the ages 1 and 2 years, with girls achieving a slightly higher score in each age group. The percentage of subjects at each age who identified different body parts is presented, indicating the sequence in which body parts are learned.