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Research Article  |   August 1986
The Predictive Validity of the Functional Capacities Evaluation
Author Affiliations
  • Susan L. Smith, MA, LOTR, FAOTA, is Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Allied Health Professions, Louisiana State University (LSU) Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana, and Director, Professional Occupational Therapy Services, Inc., 2727 Houma Boulevard, Metairie, Louisiana 70006. The latter is the mailing address
  • Sandra Cunningham, MA, LOTR, is Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Allied Health Professions, LSU Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Roger Weinberg, PhD, is Professor, Department of Biometry, LSU Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana
Article Information
Work and Industry / Features
Research Article   |   August 1986
The Predictive Validity of the Functional Capacities Evaluation
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 1986, Vol. 40, 564-567. doi:10.5014/ajot.40.8.564
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 1986, Vol. 40, 564-567. doi:10.5014/ajot.40.8.564
Abstract

This study tested the predictive validity of the Functional Capacities Evaluation (FCE), which included the following three components: a) a Medical History Review, b) a Client Activity Interview, and c) the Smith Physical Capacities Evaluation (SMITH-PCE) as the performance component. The FCE is used in conjunction with the Physical Demands and Environmental Conditions specified by the U.S. Department of Labor to predict a subject’s ability to return to work. The study used a random sample of 52 subjects. An employment questionnaire served as a criterion measure of predictive validity.

The data from the questionnaires were compared with predictions from the evaluations, and a lambdab test was applied to the data. Results suggested that for the sample analyzed, trained registered occupational therapists could use the FCE to predict a client’s ability to return to work more accurately.

The study was limited in that the sample used was drawn from clients seen in only one private practice and that only 42% of the questionnaires were returned.