Research Article  |   July 2014
Utility of an Occupational Therapy Driving Intervention for a Combat Veteran
Author Affiliations
  • Sherrilene Classen, PhD, MPH, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Adjunct Professor, Institute for Mobility, Activity and Participation and Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, and Professor and Chair, School of Occupational Therapy, Western University, Elborn College, 1201 Western Road, London, Ontario N6G 1H1 Canada; sclassen@uwo.ca
  • Miriam Monahan, MS, OTR/L, CDRS, is Adjunct Scholar and Certified Driving Rehabilitation Specialist, Institute for Mobility, Activity and Participation and Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Maria Canonizado is Bachelor of Health Science Student, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Sandra Winter, PhD, OTR/L, is Postdoctoral Associate, Institute for Mobility, Activity and Participation and Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville
Article Information
Community Mobility and Driving / Military Rehabilitation / Special Issue: Occupational Therapy Research With Military Personnel, Veterans, and Their Families
Research Article   |   July 2014
Utility of an Occupational Therapy Driving Intervention for a Combat Veteran
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2014, Vol. 68, 405-411. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.010041
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2014, Vol. 68, 405-411. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.010041
Abstract

Many combat veterans are injured in motor vehicle crashes shortly after returning to civilian life, yet little evidence exists on effective driving interventions. In this single-subject design study, we compared clinical test results and driving errors in a returning combat veteran before and after an occupational therapy driving intervention. A certified driving rehabilitation specialist administered baseline clinical and simulated driving assessments; conducted three intervention sessions that discussed driving errors, retrained visual search skills, and invited commentary on driving; and administered a postintervention evaluation in conditions resembling those at baseline. Clinical test results were similar pre- and postintervention. Baseline versus postintervention driving errors were as follows: lane maintenance, 23 versus 7; vehicle positioning, 5 versus 1; signaling, 2 versus 0; speed regulation, 1 versus 1; visual scanning, 1 versus 0; and gap acceptance, 1 versus 0. Although the intervention appeared efficacious for this participant, threats to validity must be recognized and controlled for in a follow-up study.