Research Article  |   July 2014
Interdisciplinary Residential Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury: Effects on Symptom Severity and Occupational Performance and Satisfaction
Author Affiliations
  • Sarah M. Speicher, MOT, OTR, is Occupational Therapist, Trauma Recovery Center, Cincinnati Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH
  • Kristen H. Walter, PhD, is Clinical Psychologist and Independent Clinical Evaluator, Veterans Medical Research Foundation and Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, CA
  • Kathleen M. Chard, PhD, is Director, Trauma Recovery Center, Cincinnati Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 1000 South Fort Thomas Avenue, Fort Thomas, KY 41075, and Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cincinnati Medical School, Cincinnati, OH; Kathleen.Chard@va.gov
Article Information
Mental Health / Military Rehabilitation / Multidisciplinary Practice / Neurologic Conditions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Special Issue: Occupational Therapy Research With Military Personnel, Veterans, and Their Families
Research Article   |   July 2014
Interdisciplinary Residential Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury: Effects on Symptom Severity and Occupational Performance and Satisfaction
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2014, Vol. 68, 412-421. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.011304
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2014, Vol. 68, 412-421. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.011304
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. This study examined outcomes of an 8-wk residential treatment program for veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI).

METHOD. Twenty-six veterans completed the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale, Beck Depression Inventory–2nd Edition, and PTSD Checklist before and after treatment.

RESULTS. Veterans demonstrated significant improvements in occupational performance and satisfaction with their performance, as well as in PTSD and depression symptom severity after residential PTSD/TBI treatment. Additionally, improvements in occupational performance and satisfaction were associated with decreases in depression symptom severity.

CONCLUSION. Although preliminary, results suggest that veterans with PTSD and a history of TBI experienced significant decreases in PTSD and depression symptom severity and improvement in self-perception of performance and satisfaction in problematic occupational areas. Changes in occupational areas and depression symptom severity were related, highlighting the importance of interdisciplinary treatment.