Research Article  |   July 2014
Composition of a Vision Screen for Servicemembers With Traumatic Brain Injury: Consensus Using a Modified Nominal Group Technique
Author Affiliations
  • Mary Vining Radomski, PhD, OTR/L, is Clinical Scientist, Courage Kenny Research Center, 800 East 28th Street @ Chicago (No. 12212), Minneapolis, MN 55407; mary.radomski@allina.com
  • Marsha Finkelstein, MS, is Senior Scientific Advisor, Courage Kenny Research Center, Minneapolis, MN
  • Imelda Llanos, MS, OTR/L, is Vision Impairment Clinic Program Manager, James A. Haley Veterans Hospital, Tampa, FL
  • Mitchell Scheiman, OD, is Professor, Pennsylvania College of Optometry, Philadelphia
  • Sharon Gowdy Wagener, MAOT, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapist, Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute, Minneapolis, MN
Article Information
Military Rehabilitation / Neurologic Conditions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Vision / Special Issue: Occupational Therapy Research With Military Personnel, Veterans, and Their Families
Research Article   |   July 2014
Composition of a Vision Screen for Servicemembers With Traumatic Brain Injury: Consensus Using a Modified Nominal Group Technique
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2014, Vol. 68, 422-429. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.011445
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2014, Vol. 68, 422-429. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.011445
Abstract

Vision impairment is common in the first year after traumatic brain injury (TBI), including among service members whose brain injuries occurred during deployment in Iraq and Afghanistan. Occupational therapy practitioners provide routine vision screening to inform treatment planning and referral to vision specialists, but existing methods are lacking because many tests were developed for children and do not screen for vision dysfunction typical of TBI. An expert panel was charged with specifying the composition of a vision screening protocol for servicemembers with TBI. A modified nominal group technique fostered discussion and objective determinations of consensus. After considering 29 vision tests, the panel recommended a nine-test vision screening that examines functional performance, self-reported problems, far–near acuity, reading, accommodation, convergence, eye alignment and binocular vision, saccades, pursuits, and visual fields. Research is needed to develop reliable, valid, and clinically feasible vision screening protocols to identify TBI-related vision disorders in adults.