Research Article  |   September 2014
Measurement in Sensory Modulation: The Sensory Processing Scale Assessment
Author Affiliations
  • Sarah A. Schoen, PhD, OTR, is Associate Director of Research, Sensory Processing Disorder Foundation, 5420 South Quebec Street, Suite 135, Greenwood Village, CO 80111, and Associate Professor, Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions, Provo, UT; schoen@spdfoundation.net
  • Lucy J. Miller, PhD, OTR, is Clinical Director, STAR Center, Greenwood Village, CO; Research Director, Sensory Processing Disorder Foundation, Greenwood Village, CO; Professor, Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions, Provo, UT; and Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Denver
  • Jillian C. Sullivan, PhD, is Postdoctoral Fellow, Sensory Processing Disorder Foundation, Greenwood Village, CO
Article Information
Assessment Development and Testing / Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder / Autism/Autism Spectrum Disorder / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Sensory Integration and Processing / Special Issue: Sensory Integration Measurement
Research Article   |   September 2014
Measurement in Sensory Modulation: The Sensory Processing Scale Assessment
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2014, Vol. 68, 522-530. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.012377
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2014, Vol. 68, 522-530. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.012377
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. Sensory modulation issues have a significant impact on participation in daily life. Moreover, understanding phenotypic variation in sensory modulation dysfunction is crucial for research related to defining homogeneous groups and for clinical work in guiding treatment planning. We thus evaluated the new Sensory Processing Scale (SPS) Assessment.

METHOD. Research included item development, behavioral scoring system development, test administration, and item analyses to evaluate reliability and validity across sensory domains.

RESULTS. Items with adequate reliability (internal reliability >.4) and discriminant validity (p < .01) were retained. Feedback from the expert panel also contributed to decisions about retaining items in the scale.

CONCLUSION. The SPS Assessment appears to be a reliable and valid measure of sensory modulation (scale reliability >.90; discrimination between group effect sizes >1.00). This scale has the potential to aid in differential diagnosis of sensory modulation issues.