Research Article  |   September 2014
Development of Self-Awareness After Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Through Participation in Occupation-Based Rehabilitation: Mixed-Methods Analysis of a Case Series
Author Affiliations
  • Emmah Doig, PhD, BOccThy Hons, is NHMRC Post Doctoral Research Fellow, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia Campus, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia 4067; e.doig@uq.edu.au
  • Pim Kuipers, PhD, BA Hons, MA, Grad Dip Rehab, is Associate Professor, Centre for Functioning and Health Research, Metro South Health District, Queensland Health, Brisbane, Australia, and Population and Social Health Research Program, Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia
  • Sarah Prescott, B Int Bus, BOccThy Hons, is PhD Student, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
  • Petrea Cornwell, PhD, B SpPath Hons, is Principal Research Fellow, Metro North Hospital and Health Service, Queensland Health, Chermside, Brisbane, Australia, and School of Applied Psychology and Behavioural Basis of Health, Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University, Mount Gravatt, Brisbane, Australia
  • Jennifer Fleming, PhD, BOccThy Hons, is Associate Professor, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, and Centre for Functioning and Health Research, Metro South Health District, Queensland Health, Brisbane, Australia.
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Traumatic Brain Injury / Rehabilitation, Disability, and Participation
Research Article   |   September 2014
Development of Self-Awareness After Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Through Participation in Occupation-Based Rehabilitation: Mixed-Methods Analysis of a Case Series
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2014, Vol. 68, 578-588. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.010785
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2014, Vol. 68, 578-588. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.010785
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We examined participation in goal planning and development of self-awareness for people with impaired self-awareness after traumatic brain injury.

METHOD. We performed a mixed-methods study of 8 participants recently discharged from inpatient rehabilitation. Self-awareness was measured using discrepancy between self and significant other ratings on the Mayo–Portland Adaptability Index (MPAI–4) at four time points. We calculated effect size to evaluate the change in MPAI–4 discrepancy over time.

RESULTS. Seven participants identified their own goals. We found a large reduction in mean MPAI–4 discrepancy (M = 8.57, SD = 6.59, N = 7, d = 1.08) in the first 6 wk and a further small reduction (M = 5.33, SD = 9.09, N = 6, d = 0.45) in the second 6 wk of intervention. Case data indicated that 7 participants demonstrated some growth in self-awareness.

CONCLUSION. Engagement in occupation-based, goal-directed rehabilitation appeared to foster awareness of injury-related changes to varying extents.