Brief Report  |   September 2014
Scholarship and Research in Occupational Therapy Education
Author Affiliations
  • Jyothi Gupta, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Professor, Henrietta Schmoll School of Health, St. Catherine University, 601 25th Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55454; jgupta@stkate.edu
  • Andrea Bilics, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Professor, Occupational Therapy, and Director, Center for Teaching and Learning, Worcester State University, Worcester, MA
Article Information
Education of OTs and OTAs / Departments / Brief Report
Brief Report   |   September 2014
Scholarship and Research in Occupational Therapy Education
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2014, Vol. 68, S87-S92. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.012880
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2014, Vol. 68, S87-S92. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.012880
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to identify a baseline or benchmark for faculty engagement and productivity in occupational therapy education scholarship and research.

METHOD. A custom-designed survey was emailed to 2,225 faculty members. The survey included questions on basic demographic information and education scholarship (e.g., use of evidence to inform teaching, frequency and nature of involvement in education scholarship.

RESULTS. A total of 520 faculty members (23%) completed the survey. Of these, 450 (86.5%) identified themselves as full-time core faculty, and only their responses were analyzed. Although 90% of the faculty respondents engaged in scholarly teaching, only 34% identified education as an area of content expertise, and only 16% reported frequent involvement with education scholarship. Instructional methods were the primary area of study.

CONCLUSION. A need exists to build research capacity for education research and more diversification of education research topics, including professional socialization and competencies.