Research Article  |   November 2014
Evaluation of a Pilot Parent-Delivered Play-Based Intervention for Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Author Affiliations
  • Sarah Wilkes-Gillan, BAppSc(OT)Hons, is PhD Candidate, University of Sydney, 75 East Street, Lidcombe, New South Wales 2141, Australia; swil8454@uni.sydney.edu.au
  • Anita Bundy, ScD, is Professor and Chair of Occupational Therapy, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Reinie Cordier, PhD, is Associate Professor, School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Michelle Lincoln, PhD, is Professor and Deputy Dean, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Article Information
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Children and Youth
Research Article   |   November 2014
Evaluation of a Pilot Parent-Delivered Play-Based Intervention for Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November/December 2014, Vol. 68, 700-709. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.012450
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November/December 2014, Vol. 68, 700-709. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.012450
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. This study evaluated a parent-delivered intervention aiming to address the social difficulties of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The intervention was evaluated from three perspectives: effectiveness, feasibility, and appropriateness.

METHOD. This one-group pretest–posttest study included 5 children with ADHD and their parents, who had previously participated in a therapist-delivered play-based intervention. The 7-wk parent-delivered intervention involved home modules (including a DVD, manual, and play dates with a typically developing playmate) and three therapist-led clinic-based play sessions. The Test of Playfulness was used as a pre- and postintervention and follow-up measure. Parents were interviewed 1 mo following the intervention, and data were analyzed for recurring themes.

RESULTS. Children’s social play outcomes improved significantly from pretest to 1-mo follow-up (Z = 2.02, p = .04, d = 1.0). Three themes emerged: the clinic play environment as a sanctuary, parental barriers to intervention delivery, and tools for repeating learned lessons.

CONCLUSION. The parent-delivered intervention demonstrated preliminary evidence for feasibility and effectiveness. Further research is warranted regarding appropriateness.