Research Article  |   December 2014
Effectiveness of Occupation-Based Interventions to Improve Areas of Occupation and Social Participation After Stroke: An Evidence-Based Review
Author Affiliations
  • Timothy J. Wolf, OTD, MSCI, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor, Program in Occupational Therapy and Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Washington University, St. Louis, MO; wolft@wustl.edu
  • Adrianna Chuh, MSOT, is Graduate Student, Program in Occupational Therapy, School of Medicine, Washington University, St. Louis, MO
  • Tracy Floyd, MS, OTR/L, is Battalion Rehab Manager, U.S. Army, Warrior Transition Battalion, Fort Belvoir, VA.
  • Karen McInnis, MSOT, is Graduate Student, Program in Occupational Therapy, School of Medicine, Washington University, St. Louis, MO
  • Elizabeth Williams, MSOT, is Graduate Student, Program in Occupational Therapy, School of Medicine, Washington University, St. Louis, MO
Article Information
Evidence-Based Practice / Neurologic Conditions / Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Stroke / Special Issue
Research Article   |   December 2014
Effectiveness of Occupation-Based Interventions to Improve Areas of Occupation and Social Participation After Stroke: An Evidence-Based Review
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, December 2014, Vol. 69, 6901180060p1-6901180060p11. doi:10.5014/ajot.2015.012195
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, December 2014, Vol. 69, 6901180060p1-6901180060p11. doi:10.5014/ajot.2015.012195
Abstract

This evidence-based review examined the evidence supporting the use of occupation-based interventions to improve areas of occupation and social participation poststroke. A total of 39 studies met the inclusion criteria and were critically evaluated. Most of the literature targeted activity of daily living (ADL)–based interventions and collectively provided strong evidence for the use of occupation-based interventions to improve ADL performance. The evidence related to instrumental ADLs was much more disparate, with limited evidence to support the use of virtual reality interventions and emerging evidence to support driver education programs to improve occupational performance poststroke. Only 6 studies addressed leisure, social participation, or rest and sleep, with sufficient evidence to support only leisure-based interventions. The implications of this review for research, education, and practice in occupational therapy are also discussed.