Research Article  |   February 2015
Improving Quality of Life and Depression After Stroke Through Telerehabilitation
Author Affiliations
  • Susan M. Linder, PT, DPT, NCS, is Physical Therapist and Research Scientist, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Center for Neurological Restoration, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
  • Anson B. Rosenfeldt, PT, DPT, MBA, is Physical Therapist, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Center for Neurological Restoration, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
  • R. Curtis Bay, PhD, is Biostatistician, Arizona School of Health Sciences, A. T. Still University, Mesa, AZ
  • Komal Sahu, MPH, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapist, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA
  • Steven L. Wolf, PhD, PT, FAPTA, FAHA, is Physical Therapist and Professor, Division of Physical Therapy, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, and Senior Research Scientist, Center for Visual and Neurocognitive Rehabilitation, Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, GA
  • Jay L. Alberts, PhD, is Vice Chair, Health Enablement Technology, Neurological Institute, and Staff, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Center for Neurological Restoration, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH; albertj@ccf.org
Article Information
Complementary/Alternative Approaches / Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Stroke / Rehabilitation, Disability, and Participation
Research Article   |   February 2015
Improving Quality of Life and Depression After Stroke Through Telerehabilitation
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, February 2015, Vol. 69, 6902290020p1-6902290020p10. doi:10.5014/ajot.2015.014498
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, February 2015, Vol. 69, 6902290020p1-6902290020p10. doi:10.5014/ajot.2015.014498
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of home-based robot-assisted rehabilitation coupled with a home exercise program compared with a home exercise program alone on depression and quality of life in people after stroke.

METHOD. A multisite randomized controlled clinical trial was completed with 99 people <6 mo after stroke who had limited access to formal therapy. Participants were randomized into one of two groups, (1) a home exercise program or (2) a robot-assisted therapy + home exercise program, and participated in an 8-wk home intervention.

RESULTS. We observed statistically significant changes in all but one domain on the Stroke Impact Scale and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale for both groups.

CONCLUSION. A robot-assisted intervention coupled with a home exercise program and a home exercise program alone administered using a telerehabilitation model may be valuable approaches to improving quality of life and depression in people after stroke.