Brief Report  |   February 2015
Test–Retest Reliability of the Child Occupational Self-Assessment (COSA)
Author Affiliations
  • Alisha M. Ohl, PhD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor, Occupational Therapy Program, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn; Alisha_ohl@yahoo.com
  • Emily Crook, MS, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapist, New York City Department of Education, New York
  • Diane MacSaveny, MS, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapist, Stepping Stones Day School, Queens, New York
  • Alanna McLaughlin, MS, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapist, HealthPRO® Rehabilitation, New York, New York
Article Information
Assessment Development and Testing / Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / School-Based Practice / Departments / Brief Report
Brief Report   |   February 2015
Test–Retest Reliability of the Child Occupational Self-Assessment (COSA)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, February 2015, Vol. 69, 6902350010p1-6902350010p4. doi:10.5014/ajot.2015.014290
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, February 2015, Vol. 69, 6902350010p1-6902350010p4. doi:10.5014/ajot.2015.014290
Abstract

We examined the test–retest reliability of the Child Occupational Self-Assessment (COSA). Fifty-two children ages 6–12 yr completed the COSA on two separate occasions 7–14 days apart. Participant data were analyzed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Test–retest reliability was good for total Competence and Value scores (ICC2,1 = .72–.77) and poor to good across category scores (ICC2,1 = .44–.78). These findings suggest that the children’s perceptions of their abilities and the value they placed on their everyday activities as reflected in the test items were fairly consistent over a short period of time.