Research Article  |   April 2015
Goals Set After Completing a Teleconference-Delivered Program for Managing Multiple Sclerosis Fatigue
Author Affiliations
  • Miho Asano, PhD, is Postdoctoral Research Fellow, School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON
  • Katharine Preissner, EdD, OTR/L, is Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago
  • Rose Duffy, MS, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapist, Swedish Covenant Hospital, Chicago, IL
  • Maggie Meixell, MS, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapist, Evanston Hospital, Evanston, IL
  • Marcia Finlayson, PhD, OT Reg (Ont), OTR, is Professor and Director, School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON; marcia.finlayson@queensu.ca
Article Information
Multiple Sclerosis / Neurologic Conditions / Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Rehabilitation, Disability, and Participation
Research Article   |   April 2015
Goals Set After Completing a Teleconference-Delivered Program for Managing Multiple Sclerosis Fatigue
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, April 2015, Vol. 69, 6903290010p1-6903290010p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2015.015370
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, April 2015, Vol. 69, 6903290010p1-6903290010p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2015.015370
Abstract

Setting goals can be a valuable skill to self-manage multiple sclerosis (MS) fatigue. A better understanding of the goals set by people with MS after completing a fatigue management program can assist health care professionals with tailoring interventions for clients. This study aimed to describe the focus of goals set by people with MS after a teleconference-delivered fatigue management program and to evaluate the extent to which participants were able to achieve their goals over time. In total, 485 goals were set by 81 participants. Over a follow-up period, 64 participants rated 284 goals regarding progress made toward goal achievement. Approximately 50% of the rated goals were considered achieved. The most common type of goal achieved was that of instrumental activities of daily living. Short-term goals were more likely to be achieved. This study highlights the need for and importance of promoting and teaching goal-setting skills to people with MS.