Research Article  |   September 2015
Activity Pacing Self-Management in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Author Affiliations
  • Daphne Kos, PhD, OT, is Assistant Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Neuromotor Research Group, KU Leuven–University of Leuven, Belgium; Lecturer, Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Health and Social Care, Artesis Plantijn University College, Antwerp, Belgium; and Member, Pain in Motion Research Group, Brussels, Belgium; daphne.kos@faber.kuleuven.be
  • Inge van Eupen, OT, is Lecturer, Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Health and Social Care, Artesis Plantijn University College, Antwerp, Belgium
  • Jill Meirte, PT, is PhD Researcher, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences and Physiotherapy, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium. At the time of the study, she was Lecturer, Artesis Plantijn University College, Antwerp, Belgium
  • Deborah Van Cauwenbergh, PT, is PhD Researcher, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences and Physiotherapy, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium. At the time of the study, she was Lecturer, Artesis Plantijn University College, Antwerp, Belgium
  • Greta Moorkens, PhD, MD, is Associate Professor, Department of General Internal Medicine of University of Antwerp, Belgium; and Warrant-Manager, University Hospital, Antwerp, Belgium
  • Mira Meeus, PhD, PT, is Associate Professor, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences and Physiotherapy, University of Antwerp, Belgium; Associate Professor, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences and Physiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; and Member, Pain in Motion Research Group, Brussels, Belgium. At the time of the study, she was Lecturer, Artesis Plantijn University College, Antwerp, Belgium
  • Jo Nijs, PhD, PT, is Associate Professor, Departments of Human Physiology and Physiotherapy, Faculty of Physical Education and Physiotherapy, Vrije Universiteit, Brussels, Belgium; Physiotherapist, Department of Physical Medicine and Physiotherapy, University Hospital, Brussels, Belgium; and Member, Pain in Motion Research Group, Brussels, Belgium. At the time of the study, he was Lecturer, Artesis Plantijn University College, Antwerp, Belgium
Article Information
Complementary/Alternative Approaches / Mental Health / Musculoskeletal Impairments / Neurologic Conditions / Rehabilitation, Disability, and Participation
Research Article   |   September 2015
Activity Pacing Self-Management in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September 2015, Vol. 69, 6905290020p1-6905290020p11. doi:10.5014/ajot.2015.016287
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September 2015, Vol. 69, 6905290020p1-6905290020p11. doi:10.5014/ajot.2015.016287
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an activity pacing self-management (APSM) intervention in improving performance of daily life activities in women with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS).

METHOD. A total of 33 women with CFS (age 41.1 ± 11.2 yr) were randomly allocated to APSM (experimental group; n = 16) or relaxation (control group; n = 17). Main outcome measures included the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM; primary) and Checklist Individual Strength (CIS).

RESULTS. COPM scores changed significantly over time in both groups (p = .03). The change in Satisfaction scores showed a significant difference in favor only of APSM (effect size = 0.74 [0.11, 1.4]). CIS scores decreased significantly in the experimental group only (p < .01).

CONCLUSION. APSM was found to be feasible and effective in optimizing participation in desired daily life activities in women with CFS. Replication in a larger sample with long-term follow-up is required.