Research Article  |   October 2015
Simulation Strategies to Teach Patient Transfers: Self-Efficacy by Strategy
Author Affiliations
  • Joanne M. Baird, PhD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Ketki D. Raina, PhD, OTR/L, is Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Joan C. Rogers, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Professor Emeritus, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
  • John O’Donnell, DrPH, MSN, CRNA, is Professor, Department of Nurse Anesthesia, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Lauren Terhorst, PhD, is Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Margo B. Holm, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, ABDA, is Professor Emerita, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA; mbholm@pitt.edu
Article Information
Education of OTs and OTAs / School-Based Practice
Research Article   |   October 2015
Simulation Strategies to Teach Patient Transfers: Self-Efficacy by Strategy
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, October 2015, Vol. 69, 6912185030p1-6912185030p7. doi:10.5014/ajot.2015.018705
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, October 2015, Vol. 69, 6912185030p1-6912185030p7. doi:10.5014/ajot.2015.018705
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We evaluated the effects of transfer training—after training in the classroom and in the high-technology simulation laboratory (WISER Center)—on students’ perceptions of their self-efficacy for knowledge, skill, and safety in executing dependent transfers.

METHOD. After classroom training, occupational therapy students were randomized to three teaching groups on the basis of the amount of participation and observation opportunities provided at the WISER Center—observation dominant, participation dominant, and participation only.

RESULTS. The participation-dominant group reported an increase in knowledge self-efficacy over time compared with the observation-dominant and participation-only groups. Over time, self-efficacy ratings increased for all students, regardless of group.

CONCLUSION. Simulation scenarios implemented at the WISER Center provided a useful adjunct to classroom training in transfer skills. Both participatory and observational experiences contributed to the development of students’ perceptions of their ability to manage acutely ill and medically complex patients.