Brief Report  |   October 2015
National Survey of Fieldwork Educators: Implications for Occupational Therapy Education
Author Affiliations
  • Mary E. Evenson, OTD, MPH, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Associate Professor and Director of Clinical Education, School of Health and Rehabilitation Science, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA; mevenson@mghihp.edu
  • Michael Roberts, OTD, OTR/L, is Associate Professor and Program Director, Regis College MSOT Program, Weston, MA. At the start of this research, he was with the Occupational Therapy Department, Tufts University, Medford, MA
  • Jennifer Kaldenberg, MSA, OTR/L, SCLV, FAOTA, is Clinical Assistant Professor and Academic Fieldwork Coordinator, College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, Boston University, Boston, MA
  • Mary Alicia Barnes, MS, OTR/L, is Fieldwork Coordinator, Department of Occupational Therapy, Tufts University, Medford, MA
  • Rebecca Ozelie, DHS, OTR/L, BCPR, is Assistant Professor and Fieldwork Coordinator, Rush University, Chicago, IL
Article Information
Education of OTs and OTAs / Departments / Brief Report
Brief Report   |   October 2015
National Survey of Fieldwork Educators: Implications for Occupational Therapy Education
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, October 2015, Vol. 69, 6912350020p1-6912350020p5. doi:10.5014/ajot.2015.019265
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, October 2015, Vol. 69, 6912350020p1-6912350020p5. doi:10.5014/ajot.2015.019265
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to gain information on the current status of fieldwork training facilities to understand facilitators of and barriers to fieldwork education, including fieldwork educators’ perceptions of benefits, challenges, and valued supports.

METHOD. A descriptive, nonexperimental exploratory design was used. A pilot survey was conducted, and a revised online survey, consisting of 49 items, was distributed nationwide in Fall 2013.

RESULTS. Opportunity to update practice was the most commonly perceived benefit associated with fieldwork, and workload or time was the greatest perceived challenge. Readiness and high-quality preparation of students by academic programs were the most valued supports. Participants also identified preferred time frames and supervisory models of fieldwork education.

CONCLUSION. Interpretation of these data provides valuable information for the profession, notably academic programs, regarding needs and resources to foster collaborative relationships with fieldwork facilities to meet the growing need for fieldwork education.