Brief Report  |   October 2015
Development and Preliminary Reliability of the Functional Upper Extremity Levels (FUEL)
Author Affiliations
  • Stephen Van Lew, MS, OTR/L, is Director of Occupational Therapy, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY; steve.vanlew@nyumc.org
  • Daniel Geller, MS, MPH, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapy Research Clinical Specialist, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY
  • Rachel Feld-Glazman, MS, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapy Program Director, Burke Rehabilitation Hospital, White Plains, NY
  • Nettie Capasso, MS, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapy Assistant Supervisor, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY
  • Adrienne Dicembri, MPH, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapy Supervisor, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY
  • Genevieve Pinto Zipp, EdD, PT, is Professor, Interprofessional Health Sciences and Health Administration Department, and Director, Center for Interprofessional Education in Health Sciences, Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ
Article Information
Hand and Upper Extremity / Neurologic Conditions / Stroke / Departments / Brief Report
Brief Report   |   October 2015
Development and Preliminary Reliability of the Functional Upper Extremity Levels (FUEL)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, October 2015, Vol. 69, 6906350010p1-6906350010p5. doi:10.5014/ajot.2015.016006
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, October 2015, Vol. 69, 6906350010p1-6906350010p5. doi:10.5014/ajot.2015.016006
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The Functional Upper Extremity Levels (FUEL) is a new classification tool to assess a person’s upper-extremity functional and physical performance after sustaining a stroke. The aim of this preliminary study was to develop the tool and determine its content validity and interrater reliability.

METHOD. Forty-four licensed occupational therapists ranging in years of experience from 6 mo to 16 yr participated in this study. A two-phase study was conducted: (1) constructing the FUEL and determining its content validity and (2) ascertaining its interrater reliability.

RESULTS. We found that the FUEL had initial content validity and substantial interrater reliability (Fleiss κ = .754).

CONCLUSION. The FUEL can be a useful clinical and research tool in occupational therapy for the assessment and classification of upper-extremity function for people after stroke. Further studies with larger samples and comparison studies with other similar tools are required to support the tool’s reliability and validity.