Research Article  |   November 2015
Multiple Treatments of Pediatric Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (pCIMT): A Clinical Cohort Study
Author Affiliations
  • Stephanie C. DeLuca, PhD, is Director, Neuromotor Research Clinic, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, and Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke; Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; and Assistant Professor, Department of Rehabilitation and Wellness, Jefferson College of Health Sciences, Roanoke, VA; stephdeluca@vt.edu
  • Sharon Landesman Ramey, PhD, is Distinguished Scholar and Professor, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, and Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke; Professor, Department of Psychology, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; and Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke
  • Mary Rebekah Trucks, OTR/L, is Research Faculty and Senior Occupational Therapist, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, Roanoke
  • Dorian Ainsworth Wallace, OTR/L, is Research Faculty and Senior Occupational Therapist, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, Roanoke
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention
Research Article   |   November 2015
Multiple Treatments of Pediatric Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (pCIMT): A Clinical Cohort Study
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November 2015, Vol. 69, 6906180010p1-6906180010p9. doi:10.5014/ajot.2015.019323
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November 2015, Vol. 69, 6906180010p1-6906180010p9. doi:10.5014/ajot.2015.019323
Abstract

Pediatric constraint-induced movement therapy (pCIMT) is one of the most efficacious treatments for children with cerebral palsy (CP). Distinctive components of pCIMT include constraint of the less impaired upper extremity (UE), high-intensity therapy for the more impaired UE (≥3 hr/day, many days per week, for multiple weeks), use of shaping techniques combined with repetitive task practice, and bimanual transfer. A critical issue is whether multiple treatments of pCIMT produce additional benefit. In a clinical cohort (mean age = 31 mo) of 28 children with asymmetrical CP whose parents sought multiple pCIMT treatments, the children gained a mean of 13.2 (standard deviation [SD] = 4.2) new functional skills after Treatment 1; Treatment 2 produced a mean of 7.3 (SD = 4.7) new skills; and Treatment 3, 6.5 (SD = 4.2). These findings support the conclusion that multiple pCIMT treatments can produce clinically important functional gains for children with hemiparetic CP.