Research Article  |   November 2015
Behavioral and Physiological Factors Associated With Selective Eating in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Author Affiliations
  • Kelly Tanner, PhD, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapy Research Coordinator, Division of Clinical Therapies, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH, and Lecturer, The Ohio State University, Columbus; Kelly.tanner@nationwidechildrens.org
  • Jane Case-Smith, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA, was Professor and Chair, Occupational Therapy Division, The Ohio State University, Columbus, at the time of the study
  • Marcia Nahikian-Nelms, PhD, RDN, LD, CNSC, FAND, is Clinical Professor, Medical Dietetics Division, The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Karen Ratliff-Schaub, MD, is Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Section of Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH, and Co-Director, Leadership Education for Neurodevelopmental Disabilities Program, Nisonger Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Colleen Spees, PhD, MEd, RDN, FAND, is Assistant Professor, Medical Dietetics Division, The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Amy R. Darragh, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Associate Professor, Occupational Therapy Division, The Ohio State University, Columbus
Article Information
Autism/Autism Spectrum Disorder / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention
Research Article   |   November 2015
Behavioral and Physiological Factors Associated With Selective Eating in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November 2015, Vol. 69, 6906180030p1-6906180030p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2015.019273
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November 2015, Vol. 69, 6906180030p1-6906180030p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2015.019273
Abstract

Selective eating is common in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but it is not yet well understood. The objectives of this study were to examine a new definition of selective eating, compare behavioral measures between children with ASD and selective eating and those without selective eating, and determine relationships among behavioral measures and measures of selective eating. Participants were assigned to groups on the basis of number of foods eaten compared with a population-based sample. Results of one-way multivariate analysis of variance indicated no overall effect of group for challenging behaviors, sensory reactivity, or repetitive behaviors. Between-participant tests indicated that scores for compulsive behaviors were significantly lower (p = .036) for the selective eating group. Correlations were moderately strong among variables relating to food intake and behavioral variables, but were not significant between selective eating and behavioral variables. Further research is needed to validate the definition of selective eating and to identify targets for intervention.