Research Article  |   December 2015
Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of Frequency Modulation Devices in Improving Academic Outcomes in Children With Auditory Processing Difficulties
Author Affiliations
  • Stacey Reynolds, PhD, OTR/L, is Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond; Reynoldsse3@vcu.edu
  • Heather Miller Kuhaneck, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, CT
  • Beth Pfeiffer, PhD, OTR/L, BCP, is Associate Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
Article Information
Evidence-Based Practice / School-Based Practice / Children and Youth
Research Article   |   December 2015
Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of Frequency Modulation Devices in Improving Academic Outcomes in Children With Auditory Processing Difficulties
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, December 2015, Vol. 70, 7001220030p1-7001220030p11. doi:10.5014/ajot.2016.016832
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, December 2015, Vol. 70, 7001220030p1-7001220030p11. doi:10.5014/ajot.2016.016832
Abstract

This systematic review describes the published evidence related to the effectiveness of frequency modulation (FM) devices in improving academic outcomes in children with auditory processing difficulties. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses standards were used to identify articles published between January 2003 and March 2014. The Cochrane Population, Intervention, Control, Outcome, Study Design approach and the American Occupational Therapy Association process forms were used to guide the article selection and evaluation process. Of the 83 articles screened, 7 matched the systematic review inclusion criteria. Findings were consistently positive, although limitations were identified. Results of this review indicate moderate support for the use of FM devices to improve children’s ability to listen and attend in the classroom and mixed evidence to improve specific academic performance areas. FM technology should be considered for school-age children with auditory processing impairments who are receiving occupational therapy services to improve functioning in the school setting.