Brief Report  |   December 2015
Range of Motion Requirements for Upper-Limb Activities of Daily Living
Author Affiliations
  • Deanna H. Gates, PhD, is Assistant Professor, School of Kinesiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; gatesd@umich.edu
  • Lisa Smurr Walters, OTR, CHT, is Occupational Therapist, Center for the Intrepid, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Ft. Sam Houston, TX
  • Jeffrey Cowley, MS, is Graduate Student, School of Kinesiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Jason M. Wilken, PT, PhD, is Director, Military Performance Laboratory, Center for the Intrepid, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Ft. Sam Houston, TX
  • Linda Resnik, PT, PhD, is Research Career Scientist, Providence VA, and Professor (Research), Health Services, Policy and Practice, Brown University, Providence, RI
Article Information
Hand and Upper Extremity / Military Rehabilitation / Departments / Brief Report
Brief Report   |   December 2015
Range of Motion Requirements for Upper-Limb Activities of Daily Living
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, December 2015, Vol. 70, 7001350010p1-7001350010p10. doi:10.5014/ajot.2016.015487
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, December 2015, Vol. 70, 7001350010p1-7001350010p10. doi:10.5014/ajot.2016.015487
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We quantified the range of motion (ROM) required for eight upper-extremity activities of daily living (ADLs) in healthy participants.

METHOD. Fifteen right-handed participants completed several bimanual and unilateral basic ADLs while joint kinematics were monitored using a motion capture system. Peak motions of the pelvis, trunk, shoulder, elbow, and wrist were quantified for each task.

RESULTS. To complete all activities tested, participants needed a minimum ROM of −65°/0°/105° for humeral plane angle (horizontal abduction–adduction), 0°–108° for humeral elevation, −55°/0°/79° for humeral rotation, 0°–121° for elbow flexion, −53°/0°/13° for forearm rotation, −40°/0°/38° for wrist flexion–extension, and −28°/0°/38° for wrist ulnar–radial deviation. Peak trunk ROM was 23° lean, 32° axial rotation, and 59° flexion–extension.

CONCLUSION. Full upper-limb kinematics were calculated for several ADLs. This methodology can be used in future studies as a basis for developing normative databases of upper-extremity motions and evaluating pathology in populations.