Research Article  |   February 2016
Validity and Responsiveness of the Revised Nottingham Sensation Assessment for Outcome Evaluation in Stroke Rehabilitation
Author Affiliations
  • Ching-yi Wu, ScD, is Professor and Chair, Department of Occupational Therapy and Graduate Institute of Behavioral Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
  • I-ching Chuang, PhD, is Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Occupational Therapy and Graduate Institute of Behavioral Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
  • Hui-ing Ma, ScD, is Professor, School of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan
  • Keh-chung Lin, ScD, is Professor, School of Occupational Therapy, and Director, Division of General Affairs, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, and Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; kehchunglin@ntu.edu.tw
  • Chia-ling Chen, MD, PhD, is Professor, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, and Chair, Graduate Institute of Early Intervention, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Stroke / Rehabilitation, Disability, and Participation
Research Article   |   February 2016
Validity and Responsiveness of the Revised Nottingham Sensation Assessment for Outcome Evaluation in Stroke Rehabilitation
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, February 2016, Vol. 70, 7002290040p1-7002290040p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2016.018390
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, February 2016, Vol. 70, 7002290040p1-7002290040p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2016.018390
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. This study establishes the concurrent validity, predictive validity, and responsiveness of the Revised Nottingham Sensation Assessment (rNSA) during rehabilitation for people with stroke.

METHOD. The study recruited 147 patients with stroke. The main assessment used was the rNSA, and outcome measures were the Fugl-Meyer Assessment sensory subscale (FMA–S) and motor subscale (FMA–M) and the Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living (NEADL) scale.

RESULTS. Correlation coefficients were good to excellent between the rNSA and the FMA–S. The rNSA proprioception measure was a predictor for the FMA–S. The rNSA stereognosis and tactile-pinprick measures for the proximal upper limb were predictors for the FMA–M and the NEADL scale, respectively. Responsiveness was moderate to large for three subscales of the rNSA (standardized response mean = .51–.83).

CONCLUSION. This study may support the concurrent validity, predictive validity, and responsiveness of the rNSA for people with stroke.