Research Article  |   April 2016
Effectiveness of Interventions to Address Visual and Visual–Perceptual Impairments to Improve Occupational Performance in Adults With Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review
Author Affiliations
  • Sue Berger, PhD, OTR/L, BCG, FAOTA, is Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, Boston University, College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, Boston, MA; sueb@bu.edu
  • Jennifer Kaldenberg, MSA, OTR/L, SCLV, FAOTA, is Clinical Assistant Professor and Academic Fieldwork Coordinator, Department of Occupational Therapy, Boston University, College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, Boston, MA
  • Romeissa Selmane, MS, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapist, The Home for Little Wanderers, Boston, MA. She was Entry-Level Master’s Student, Department of Occupational Therapy, Boston University, College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, Boston, MA, at the time of this research
  • Stephanie Carlo, MS, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapist, Integrated Children’s Therapy, Miami, FL. She was Entry-Level Master’s Student, Department of Occupational Therapy, Boston University, College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, Boston, MA, at the time of this research
Article Information
Evidence-Based Practice / Neurologic Conditions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Special Issue: Evidence Review
Research Article   |   April 2016
Effectiveness of Interventions to Address Visual and Visual–Perceptual Impairments to Improve Occupational Performance in Adults With Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, April 2016, Vol. 70, 7003180010p1-7003180010p7. doi:10.5014/ajot.2016.020875
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, April 2016, Vol. 70, 7003180010p1-7003180010p7. doi:10.5014/ajot.2016.020875
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. Visual and visual–perceptual impairments occur frequently with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and influence occupational performance. This systematic review examined the effectiveness of interventions within the scope of occupational therapy to improve occupational performance for adults with visual and visual–perceptual impairments as a result of TBI.

METHOD. Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, OTseeker, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched, and 66 full text articles were reviewed. Sixteen articles were included in the review.

RESULTS. Strong evidence supports the use of scanning, limited evidence supports the use of adaptive strategies, and mixed evidence supports the use of cognitive interventions to improve occupational performance for adults with TBI. Evidence related to vision therapy varies on the basis of the specific intervention implemented.

CONCLUSION. Although the strength of the research varied, implications are discussed for practice, education, and research.