Research Article  |   May 2016
Theater-Based Community Engagement Project for Veterans Recovering From Substance Use Disorders
Author Affiliations
  • Sally Wasmuth, PhD, OTR, is Assistant Professor, College of Health Sciences, School of Occupational Therapy, University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN; at the time of the study, she was Associated Health Research Fellow, Center for Health Information and Technology, Richard L. Roudebush Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN; wasmuths@uindy.edu
  • Kevin Pritchard, MS, OTR, is Occupational Therapist, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL; at the time of the study, he was Occupational Therapy Master’s Student, Department of Occupational Therapy, Indiana University—Indianapolis
Article Information
Mental Health / Military Rehabilitation / Mental Health
Research Article   |   May 2016
Theater-Based Community Engagement Project for Veterans Recovering From Substance Use Disorders
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May 2016, Vol. 70, 7004250020p1-7004250020p11. doi:10.5014/ajot.2016.018333
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May 2016, Vol. 70, 7004250020p1-7004250020p11. doi:10.5014/ajot.2016.018333
Abstract

In this study, we examine the feasibility and acceptability of a 6-wk, interdisciplinary, occupation-based theater project for facilitating community engagement and substance use disorder (SUD) recovery in veterans. All data were collected at baseline, postintervention, and 6-wk and 6-mo follow-up intervals. Of the invited veterans, 24% consented to participate (n = 14), and 50% were retained (n = 7). Average attendance was 91%. Considerable improvements in social and occupational participation were noted at postintervention and at 6-wk follow-up but were not retained at 6 mo. No important change in self-efficacy was noted. Of the participants, 86% remained abstinent for 6 wk following the intervention. Theater provides a feasible and acceptable resource for potentially facilitating SUD recovery. Larger controlled effectiveness studies of theater are needed to examine whether robust and notable recovery outcomes in people with SUDs can be linked to participation in theater.