Research Article  |   May 2016
Napping and Nighttime Sleep: Findings From an Occupation-Based Intervention
Author Affiliations
  • Natalie E. Leland, PhD, OTR/L, BCG, FAOTA, is Assistant Professor, USC Mrs. T. H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry, and Assistant Professor, Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles; nleland@usc.edu
  • Donald Fogelberg, PhD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor, Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Alix Sleight, OTD, OTR/L, is Graduate Student, USC Mrs. T. H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles
  • Trudy Mallinson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Associate Professor, Department of Clinical Research and Leadership, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, George Washington University, Washington, DC
  • Cheryl Vigen, PhD, is Research Assistant Professor, USC Mrs. T. H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles
  • Jeanine Blanchard, PhD, OTR/L, is Project Manager, USC Mrs. T. H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles
  • Mike Carlson, PhD, is Research Professor, USC Mrs. T. H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles
  • Florence Clark, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Associate Dean and Chair, USC Mrs. T. H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles
Article Information
Geriatrics/Productive Aging / Health and Wellness / Productive Aging
Research Article   |   May 2016
Napping and Nighttime Sleep: Findings From an Occupation-Based Intervention
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May 2016, Vol. 70, 7004270010p1-7004270010p7. doi:10.5014/ajot.2016.017657
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May 2016, Vol. 70, 7004270010p1-7004270010p7. doi:10.5014/ajot.2016.017657
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. To describe sleeping behaviors and trends over time among an ethnically diverse group of community-living older adults.

METHOD. A descriptive secondary data analysis of a subsample (n = 217) from the Lifestyle Redesign randomized controlled trial was done to explore baseline napping and sleeping patterns as well as 6-mo changes in these outcomes.

RESULTS. At baseline, the average time sleeping was 8.2 hr daily (standard deviation = 1.7). Among all participants, 29% reported daytime napping at baseline, of which 36% no longer napped at follow-up. Among participants who stopped napping, those who received an occupation-based intervention (n = 98) replaced napping time with nighttime sleep, and those not receiving an intervention (n = 119) experienced a net loss of total sleep (p < .05).

CONCLUSION. Among participants who stopped napping, the occupation-based intervention may be related to enhanced sleep. More research examining the role of occupation-based interventions in improving sleep is warranted.