Research Article  |   May 2016
Examining the Feasibility, Tolerability, and Preliminary Efficacy of Repetitive Task-Specific Practice for People With Unilateral Spatial Neglect
Author Affiliations
  • Emily S. Grattan, PhD, OTR/L, is Postdoctoral Scholar, Department of Health Science and Research, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston; grattan@musc.edu
  • Catherine E. Lang, PT, PhD, is Professor, Program in Physical Therapy and Program in Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
  • Rebecca Birkenmeier, OTD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor, Program of Occupational Therapy, Maryville University, St. Louis, MO
  • Margo Holm, PhD, OTR/L, is Professor Emerita, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Elaine Rubinstein, PhD, is Lecturer, Department of Psychology, Chatham University, and Senior Service Fellow, Office of Mine Safety and Health Research, Bruceton Research Center, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Jessie Van Swearingen, PT, PhD, is Associate Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Elizabeth R. Skidmore, PhD, OTR/L, is Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
Article Information
Hand and Upper Extremity / Neurologic Conditions / Stroke / Rehabilitation, Disability, and Participation
Research Article   |   May 2016
Examining the Feasibility, Tolerability, and Preliminary Efficacy of Repetitive Task-Specific Practice for People With Unilateral Spatial Neglect
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May 2016, Vol. 70, 7004290020p1-7004290020p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2016.019471
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May 2016, Vol. 70, 7004290020p1-7004290020p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2016.019471
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We examined the feasibility, tolerability, and preliminary efficacy of repetitive task-specific practice for people with unilateral spatial neglect (USN).

METHOD. People with USN ≥6 mo poststroke participated in a single-group, repeated-measures study. Attendance, total repetitions, and satisfaction indicated feasibility and pain indicated tolerability. Paired t tests and effect sizes were used to estimate changes in upper-extremity use (Motor Activity Log), function (Action Research Arm Test), and attention (Catherine Bergego Scale).

RESULTS. Twenty participants attended 99.4% of sessions and completed a high number of repetitions. Participants reported high satisfaction and low pain, and they demonstrated small, significant improvements in upper-extremity use (before Bonferroni corrections; t = –2.1, p = .04, d = .30), function (t = –3.0, p < .01, d = .20), and attention (t = –3.4, p < .01, d = –.44).

CONCLUSION. Repetitive task-specific practice is feasible and tolerable for people with USN. Improvements in upper-extremity use, function, and attention may be attainable.