Research Article  |   July 2016
Interventions to Promote Diabetes Self-Management in Children and Youth: A Scoping Review
Author Affiliations
  • Susan M. Cahill, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Founding MSOT Program Director and Associate Professor, Lewis University, Romeoville, IL. At the time of the research, she was Associate Professor, Occupational Therapy Program, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, IL; cahillsu@lewisu.edu
  • Katie M. Polo, DHS, OTR/L, CLT-LANA, is Assistant Professor, College of Health Sciences, School of Occupational Therapy, University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN. At the time of the research, she was Assistant Professor, Occupational Therapy Program, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, IL
  • Brad E. Egan, OTD, MA, CADC, OTR/L, is Associate Professor, Occupational Therapy Program, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, IL
  • Nadia Marasti is Student, Occupational Therapy Program, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, IL
Article Information
Diabetes / Special Issue: Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 2016
Interventions to Promote Diabetes Self-Management in Children and Youth: A Scoping Review
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 2016, Vol. 70, 7005180020p1-7005180020p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2016.021618
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 2016, Vol. 70, 7005180020p1-7005180020p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2016.021618
Abstract

As children and youth with diabetes grow up, they become increasingly responsible for controlling and monitoring their condition. We conducted a scoping review to explore the research literature on self-management interventions for children and youth with diabetes. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. Some of the studies reviewed combined the participant population so that children with Type 1 as well as children with Type 2 diabetes were included. The majority of the studies focused on children age 14 yr or older and provided self-management education, self-management support, or both. Parent involvement was a key component of the majority of the interventions, and the use of technology was evident in 3 studies. The findings highlight factors that occupational therapy practitioners should consider when working with pediatric diabetes teams to select self-management interventions.