Research Article  |   July 2016
Family-Centered Management of Sensory Challenges of Children With Autism: Single-Case Experimental Design
Author Affiliations
  • Kim Bulkeley, BAppSc(OT), is Associate Lecturer, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; kim.bulkeley@sydney.edu.au
  • Anita Bundy, ScD, OT, FAOTA, is Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Jacqueline Roberts, BA (Hons), DipTeach, B Applied Science (Speech Pathology), PhD, is Professor of Autism, Autism Centre of Excellence, School of Education and Professional Studies, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  • Stewart Einfeld, MD, GradCertMan (CSU) DCH (RCP&S) FRANZCP, is Chair of Mental Health and Senior Scientist, Faculty of Health Sciences, Brain and Mind Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Article Information
Autism/Autism Spectrum Disorder / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Sensory Integration and Processing / Children and Youth
Research Article   |   July 2016
Family-Centered Management of Sensory Challenges of Children With Autism: Single-Case Experimental Design
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 2016, Vol. 70, 7005220040p1-7005220040p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2016.017822
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 2016, Vol. 70, 7005220040p1-7005220040p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2016.017822
Abstract

We explored the effectiveness of a sensory-based, family-centered coaching approach to changing problematic routines for young children with autism. Three mothers of young children with autism, atypical sensory processing, and global developmental delay each participated in a single-case experimental ABA design study. Mothers selected a problematic daily routine linked to sensory challenges as the focus of four intervention sessions provided in the home. Changes in mothers’ perceptions of the children’s behavior were the primary outcome, measured daily on a visual analog scale. Visual and descriptive analyses were undertaken. The sensory-based, family-centered coaching approach showed promise for changing sensory-related problem behaviors of young children with autism, but the degree and maintenance of the intervention effect varied among participants.