Research Article  |   October 2016
Comparison of Spinal Angles in a Typing Task on a Laptop and a Desktop Computer: A Preliminary Study
Author Affiliations
  • Hiedar Alyami, MSc, PT, is Senior Musculoskeletal Physical Therapist, King Khalid Hospital, Ministry of Health, Najran, Saudi Arabia; H_Qanas@hotmail.com
  • Ali M. Albarrati, PhD, PT, is Assistant Professor, Health Rehabilitation Sciences Department, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Article Information
Musculoskeletal Impairments / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Work and Industry / Departments / Brief Report
Research Article   |   October 2016
Comparison of Spinal Angles in a Typing Task on a Laptop and a Desktop Computer: A Preliminary Study
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, October 2016, Vol. 70, 7006350020p1-7006350020p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2016.020743
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, October 2016, Vol. 70, 7006350020p1-7006350020p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2016.020743
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. This study’s objective was to discover whether a difference exists in four postural angles while performing a typing task on a laptop and a desktop computer.

METHOD. Twenty healthy participants performed a 5-min typing task on each computer.

RESULTS. Statistically significant differences for all angles were found when comparing sitting at the desktop computer with sitting at the laptop. Neck angle (p < .0005), head tilt (p < .0005), and lumbar lordosis (p = .018) were significantly higher when using the laptop. The greatest posterior pelvic tilt was associated with the desktop (p = .018).

CONCLUSION. A desktop appears to be more appropriate for the cervical and lumbar regions; however, using a laptop may be more suitable for pelvic tilt.