Research Article  |   December 2016
Effectiveness of Occupational Therapy Interventions for Adults With Fibromyalgia: A Systematic Review
Author Affiliations
  • Janet L. Poole, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Professor and Program Director, Occupational Therapy Graduate Program, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; jpoole@salud.unm.edu
  • Patricia Siegel, OTD, OTR/L, CHT, is Lecturer II, Occupational Therapy Graduate Program, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
Article Information
Complementary/Alternative Approaches / Evidence-Based Practice / Mental Health / Musculoskeletal Impairments / Special Issue: Evidence Review
Research Article   |   December 2016
Effectiveness of Occupational Therapy Interventions for Adults With Fibromyalgia: A Systematic Review
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, December 2016, Vol. 71, 7101180040p1-7101180040p10. doi:10.5014/ajot.2017.023192
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, December 2016, Vol. 71, 7101180040p1-7101180040p10. doi:10.5014/ajot.2017.023192
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. This systematic review addresses the effectiveness of occupational therapy–related interventions for adults with fibromyalgia.

METHOD. We examined the literature published between January 2000 and June 2014. A total of 322 abstracts from five databases were reviewed. Forty-two Level I studies met the inclusion criteria. Studies were evaluated primarily with regard to the following outcomes: daily activities, pain, depressive symptoms, fatigue, and sleep.

RESULTS. Strong evidence was found for interventions categorized for this review as cognitive–behavioral interventions; relaxation and stress management; emotional disclosure; physical activity; and multidisciplinary interventions for improving daily living, pain, depressive symptoms, and fatigue. There was limited to no evidence for self-management, and few interventions resulted in better sleep.

CONCLUSION. Although the evidence supports interventions within the scope of occupational therapy practice for people with fibromyalgia, few interventions were occupation based.