Research Article  |   December 2016
Factors Associated With Success in an Occupational Rehabilitation Program for Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders
Author Affiliations
  • Mark E. Hardison, MS, OTR/L, is PhD Student, Mrs. T. H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles
  • Shawn C. Roll, PhD, OTR/L, RMSKS, FAOTA, is Assistant Professor, Mrs. T. H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles; sroll@usc.edu
Article Information
Musculoskeletal Impairments / Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Work and Industry / Special Issue: Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 2016
Factors Associated With Success in an Occupational Rehabilitation Program for Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, December 2016, Vol. 71, 7101190040p1-7101190040p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2016.023200
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, December 2016, Vol. 71, 7101190040p1-7101190040p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2016.023200
Abstract

Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are a significant burden; however, no consensus has been reached on how to maximize occupational rehabilitation programs for people with these disorders, and the impact of simulating work tasks as a mode of intervention has not been well examined. In this retrospective cohort study, the authors used logistic regression to identify client and program factors predicting success for 95 clients in a general occupational rehabilitation program and 71 clients in a comprehensive occupational rehabilitation program. The final predictive model for general rehabilitation included gender, number of sessions completed, and performance of work simulation activities. Maximum hours per session was the only significant predictor of success in the comprehensive rehabilitation program. This study identifies new factors associated with success in occupational rehabilitation, specifically highlighting the importance of intensity (i.e., session length and number of sessions) of therapy and occupation-based activities for this population.