Research Article  |   January 2017
Professional Reward in the Academic Fieldwork Coordinator Role
Author Affiliations
  • Patricia Stutz-Tanenbaum, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Assistant Professor and Academic Fieldwork Coordinator, Occupational Therapy Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins; patricia.stutz-tanenbaum@colostate.edu
  • David Greene, PhD, OTR, is Associate Professor, Occupational Therapy Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins
  • Debra J. Hanson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Professor and Academic Fieldwork Coordinator, Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks
  • Jeanette Koski, OTD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor and Academic Fieldwork Coordinator, Division of Occupational Therapy, Clinical University of Utah, Salt Lake City
Article Information
Education of OTs and OTAs / Education
Research Article   |   January 2017
Professional Reward in the Academic Fieldwork Coordinator Role
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January 2017, Vol. 71, 7102230010p1-7102230010p7. doi:10.5014/ajot.2017.022046
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January 2017, Vol. 71, 7102230010p1-7102230010p7. doi:10.5014/ajot.2017.022046
Abstract

The purpose of this national survey was to explore perceptions of professional reward among occupational therapist (OT) and occupational therapy assistant (OTA) academic fieldwork coordinators (AFWCs). Agreement was found in ranking the value of six role factors: (1) fieldwork data management, (2) fieldwork site management, (3) fieldwork teaching and consultation, (4) departmental and institutional compliance, (5) scholarship and accreditation, and (6) laying groundwork for students in fieldwork. Both levels of AFWC indicated teaching and consultation had the highest value and data management the least. OT AFWCs placed significantly higher value on publishing articles and lower value on educating fieldwork educators about role delineation than OTA AFWCs. Five themes emerged regarding professional reward: (1) intrinsic reward, (2) collaboration, (3) development of the profession, (4) feeling appreciated, and (5) student success. AFWCs value activities involving personal interaction, promoting professional development, and facilitating student success. Results have implications for AFWC collaboration, workload distribution, and scholarship.