Research Article  |   January 2017
Systematic Review of Occupational Therapy and Adult Cancer Rehabilitation: Part 2. Impact of Multidisciplinary Rehabilitation and Psychosocial, Sexuality, and Return-to-Work Interventions
Author Affiliations
  • Elizabeth G. Hunter, PhD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor, Graduate Center for Gerontology, University of Kentucky, Lexington; eghunt2@uky.edu
  • Robert W. Gibson, PhD, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Professor and Director of Research, Department of Emergency Medicine, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University, Augusta
  • Marian Arbesman, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Consultant, Evidence-Based Practice Project, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD; President, ArbesIdeas, Inc., Williamsville, NY; and Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of Clinical Research and Leadership, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, George Washington University, Washington, DC
  • Mariana D’Amico, EdD, OTR/L, BCP, FAOTA, is Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL
Article Information
Evidence-Based Practice / Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Work and Industry / Centennial Topics
Research Article   |   January 2017
Systematic Review of Occupational Therapy and Adult Cancer Rehabilitation: Part 2. Impact of Multidisciplinary Rehabilitation and Psychosocial, Sexuality, and Return-to-Work Interventions
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January 2017, Vol. 71, 7102100040p1-7102100040p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2017.023572
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January 2017, Vol. 71, 7102100040p1-7102100040p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2017.023572
Abstract

This article is the second part of a systematic review of evidence for the effectiveness of cancer rehabilitation interventions within the scope of occupational therapy that address the activity and participation needs of adult cancer survivors. This article focuses on the use of multidisciplinary rehabilitation and interventions that address psychosocial outcomes, sexuality, and return to work. Strong evidence indicates that multidisciplinary rehabilitation benefits cancer survivors and that psychosocial strategies can reduce anxiety and depression. Moderate evidence indicates that interventions can support survivors in returning to the level of sexuality desired and help with return to work. Part 1 of the review also appears in this issue.