Research Article  |   January 2017
Using a Multifaceted Approach to Working With Children Who Have Differences in Sensory Processing and Integration
Author Affiliations
  • Stacey Reynolds, PhD, OTR/L, is Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond; reynoldsse3@vcu.edu
  • Tara J. Glennon, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Professor of Occupational Therapy, Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT
  • Karla Ausderau, PhD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor, Department of Kinesiology, Occupational Therapy Program, University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • Roxanna M. Bendixen, PhD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Heather Miller Kuhaneck, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy, Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, CT
  • Beth Pfeiffer, PhD, OTR/L, BCP, is Associate Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
  • Renee Watling, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA
  • Kimberly Wilkinson, PhD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy, Ithaca College, Ithaca, NY
  • Stefanie C. Bodison, OTD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor, Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles
Article Information
Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Sensory Integration and Processing / Departments / The Issue Is …
Research Article   |   January 2017
Using a Multifaceted Approach to Working With Children Who Have Differences in Sensory Processing and Integration
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January 2017, Vol. 71, 7102360010p1-7102360010p10. doi:10.5014/ajot.2017.019281
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January 2017, Vol. 71, 7102360010p1-7102360010p10. doi:10.5014/ajot.2017.019281
Abstract

Pediatric occupational therapy practitioners frequently provide interventions for children with differences in sensory processing and integration. Confusion exists regarding how best to intervene with these children and about how to describe and document methods. Some practitioners hold the misconception that Ayres Sensory Integration intervention is the only approach that can and should be used with this population. The issue is that occupational therapy practitioners must treat the whole client in varied environments; to do so effectively, multiple approaches to intervention often are required. This article presents a framework for conceptualizing interventions for children with differences in sensory processing and integration that incorporates multiple evidence-based approaches. To best meet the needs of the children and families seeking occupational therapy services, interventions must be focused on participation and should be multifaceted.