Research Article  |   March 2017
Development and Alternate Form Reliability of the Complex Task Performance Assessment (CTPA) for People With Mild Stroke
Author Affiliations
  • Juan Pablo Saa, OTD, MPH, is Doctoral Student, Program in Occupational Therapy, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO; Master of Public Health Student, George Warren Brown School of Social Work and Public Health, Washington University, St. Louis, MO
  • Meghan Doherty, MSOT, is Research Coordinator and Clinical Specialist, Program in Occupational Therapy, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
  • Alexis Young, BA, is Research Assistant, Program in Occupational Therapy, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
  • Meredith Spiers, MA, is Research Coordinator, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • Emily Leary, PhD, is Assistant Professor, Biostatistics and Research Design Unit, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • Timothy J. Wolf, OTD, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Missouri, Columbia; wolftj@health.missouri.edu
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Stroke / Work and Industry / Special Issue
Research Article   |   March 2017
Development and Alternate Form Reliability of the Complex Task Performance Assessment (CTPA) for People With Mild Stroke
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March 2017, Vol. 71, 7103190030p1-7103190030p7. doi:10.5014/ajot.2017.024356
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March 2017, Vol. 71, 7103190030p1-7103190030p7. doi:10.5014/ajot.2017.024356
Abstract

Cognitive impairment is a common consequence of mild stroke. Current performance-based assessments for mild stroke can detect mild impairments in executive function but lack alternate forms to be used as outcome measures. This study aimed to develop an alternate form of the Complex Task Performance Assessment (CTPA–Alt), a performance-based assessment of executive function, and to establish the alternate form reliability of the CTPA–Alt. A repeated-measures study was conducted with 26 community participants. Participants were screened for eligibility and administered both forms of the CTPA; administration order was alternated. Overall performance was significantly correlated (rs = .44, p = .03), but pattern of scoring differed by CTPA form and order of administration. Our results indicate that the CTPA forms were similar but that the specific tasks in each form were different. The CTPA may be used as an ecologically valid outcome assessment with further considerations.