Research Article  |   March 2017
Do Neglect Assessments Detect Neglect Differently?
Author Affiliations
  • Emily S. Grattan, PhD, OTR/L, is Postdoctoral Scholar, Department of Health Science and Research, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston; grattan@musc.edu
  • Michelle L. Woodbury, PhD, OTR/L, is Associate Professor, Department of Health Science and Research, Division of Occupational Therapy, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, and Research Health Scientist, Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Charleston, SC
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Stroke / Special Issue
Research Article   |   March 2017
Do Neglect Assessments Detect Neglect Differently?
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March 2017, Vol. 71, 7103190050p1-7103190050p9. doi:10.5014/ajot.2017.025015
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March 2017, Vol. 71, 7103190050p1-7103190050p9. doi:10.5014/ajot.2017.025015
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We determined whether various assessment tools detect neglect differently by administering a battery of assessments to people with stroke.

METHOD. We conducted a case series study and administered five neglect assessments (paper-and-pencil, functional, virtual reality) to participants poststroke.

RESULTS. Twelve participants (6 men, 6 women) with stroke completed the assessment battery, which required approximately 2 hr to administer (over one to two sessions). All participants demonstrated neglect on three or more assessments. Functional assessments and the virtual reality assessment detected neglect more frequently than the paper-and-pencil assessments. Participants performed differently on the paper-and-pencil assessments and functional assessments.

CONCLUSION. Because neglect is complex, detection may depend largely on the assessment administered.