In Brief  |   March 2017
Supporting Stroke Motor Recovery Through a Mobile Application: A Pilot Study
Author Affiliations
  • Sonia Lawson, PhD, OTR/L, is Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science, Towson University, Towson, MD; slawson@towson.edu
  • Ziying Tang, PhD, is Assistant Professor, Department of Computer and Information Sciences, Towson University, Towson, MD
  • Jinjuan Feng, PhD, is Professor, Department of Computer and Information Sciences, Towson University, Towson, MD
Article Information
Complementary/Alternative Approaches / Neurologic Conditions / Stroke / Departments / Brief Report
In Brief   |   March 2017
Supporting Stroke Motor Recovery Through a Mobile Application: A Pilot Study
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March 2017, Vol. 71, 7103350010p1-7103350010p5. doi:10.5014/ajot.2017.025023
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March 2017, Vol. 71, 7103350010p1-7103350010p5. doi:10.5014/ajot.2017.025023
Abstract

Neuroplasticity and motor learning are promoted with repetitive movement, appropriate challenge, and performance feedback. ARMStrokes, a smartphone application, incorporates these qualities to support motor recovery. Engaging exercises are easily accessible for improved compliance. In a multiple-case, mixed-methods pilot study, the potential of this technology for stroke motor recovery was examined. Exercises calibrated to the participant’s skill level targeted forearm, elbow, and shoulder motions for a 6-wk protocol. Visual, auditory, and vibration feedback promoted self-assessment. Pre- and posttest data from 6 chronic stroke survivors who used the app in different ways (i.e., to measure active or passive motion, to track endurance) demonstrated improvements in accuracy of movements, fatigue, range of motion, and performance of daily activities. Statistically significant changes were not obtained with this pilot study. Further study on the efficacy of this technology is supported.