Research Article  |   April 2017
Rehabilitation Research at the National Institutes of Health: Moving the Field Forward (Executive Summary)
Author Affiliations
  • Walter R. Frontera, MD, PhD, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, and Department of Physical Medicine, Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine, University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, San Juan, PR. Address correspondence to Walter R. Frontera, MD, PhD, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 2201 Children’s Way, Suite 1318, Nashville, TN 37212; walter.frontera@vanderbilt.edu.
  • Jonathan F. Bean, MD, MS, MPH, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, and New England GRECC, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA
  • Diane Damiano, PT, PhD, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
  • Linda Ehrlich-Jones, PhD, RN, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Northwestern Feinberg Medical School and Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • Melanie Fried-Oken, PhD, CCC/Sp, Departments of Neurology, Pediatrics, BME, ENT, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland
  • Alan Jette, PT, PhD, Health and Disability Research Institute, School of Public Health, Boston University, Boston, MA
  • Ranu Jung, PhD, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Florida International University, Miami
  • Rick L. Lieber, PhD, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Northwestern Feinberg Medical School and Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • James F. Malec, PhD, ABPP-Cn, Rp, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Indiana University School of Medicine and Rehabilitation Hospital of Indiana, Indianapolis
  • Michael J. Mueller, PT, PhD, Program in Physical Therapy and Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
  • Kenneth J. Ottenbacher, PhD, OTR, Division of Rehabilitation Sciences, School of Health Professions, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston
  • Keith E. Tansey, MD, PhD, Methodist Rehabilitation Center, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson Veterans Administration Medical Center, Jackson, MS
  • Aiko Thompson, PhD, Department of Health Science and Research, College of Health Professions, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston
Article Information
Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Reports
Research Article   |   April 2017
Rehabilitation Research at the National Institutes of Health: Moving the Field Forward (Executive Summary)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, April 2017, Vol. 71, 7103320010P1-7103320010P12. doi:10.5014/ajot.2017.713003
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, April 2017, Vol. 71, 7103320010P1-7103320010P12. doi:10.5014/ajot.2017.713003
Abstract

Approximately 53 million Americans live with a disability. For decades, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has been conducting and supporting research to discover new ways to minimize disability and enhance the quality of life of people with disabilities. After the passage of the Americans With Disabilities Act, NIH established the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research, with the goal of developing and implementing a rehabilitation research agenda. Currently, 17 institutes and centers at NIH invest more than $500 million per year in rehabilitation research. Recently, the director of NIH, Francis Collins, appointed a Blue Ribbon Panel to evaluate the status of rehabilitation research across institutes and centers. As a follow-up to the work of that panel, NIH recently organized a conference, “Rehabilitation Research at NIH: Moving the Field Forward.” This report is a summary of the discussions and proposals that will help guide rehabilitation research at NIH in the near future.