Research Article  |   May 2017
Intrarater Reliability and Other Psychometrics of the Health Promoting Activities Scale (HPAS)
Author Affiliations
  • Rachel Muskett, BOT(Hon.), is Occupational Therapist, IPAR Rehabilitation, Mildura, Victoria, Australia
  • Helen Bourke-Taylor, PhD, is Associate Professor, Occupational Therapy Program, School of Primary and Allied Health, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Frankston, Victoria, Australia; helen.bourke-taylor@monash.edu
  • Alana Hewitt, PhD, is Lecturer, Occupational Therapy, School of Primary and Allied Health Care, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Frankston, Victoria, Australia. At the time of the study, she was Lecturer, School of Allied Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia
Article Information
Assessment Development and Testing / Health and Wellness / Special Issue: Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 2017
Intrarater Reliability and Other Psychometrics of the Health Promoting Activities Scale (HPAS)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May 2017, Vol. 71, 7104190010p1-7104190010p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2017.021162
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May 2017, Vol. 71, 7104190010p1-7104190010p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2017.021162
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The Health Promoting Activities Scale (HPAS) measures the self-rated frequency with which adults participate in activities that promote health. We evaluated the internal consistency, construct validity, and intrarater reliability of the HPAS with a cohort of mothers (N = 56) of school-age children.

METHOD. We used an online survey that included the HPAS and measures of mental and physical health. Statistical analysis included intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), measurement error, error range, limits of agreement, and minimum detectable change (MDC).

RESULTS. The HPAS showed good internal consistency (Cronbach’s α = .73). Construct validity was supported by a significant difference in HPAS scores among participants grouped by physical activity level; no other differences were significant. Results included a high aggregate ICC of .90 and an MDC of 5 points.

CONCLUSION. Our evaluation of the HPAS revealed good reliability and stability, suggesting suitability for ongoing evaluation as an outcome measure.